Tag Archives: western new york

Thanksgiving: Part II

Last year we came to you with a bit of the history of the first American Thanksgiving. This year, we’re casting our net a bit wider. Join Averill and Sarah as they talk about the complicated history of corn, some insights into Haudenosaunee food culture, and some regional perspectives on Thanksgiving.

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Show Notes and Further Reading

Bachmann, Karen. “Canadian origin to Thanksgiving?” The Daily Press. October 11, 2015. 

Warren,  Nathan B. The Holidays: Christmas, Easter, and Whitsuntide; together with the May-day, Midsummer, and Harvest-Home Festivals. Troy, N.Y., H. B. Nims and Company: 1876.

Mann, Barbara Alice. George Washington’s War on Native America. (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2008).

Moss, Robert. “How Thanksgiving, ‘The Yankee Abolitionist Holiday,’ Won Over the South.” 

Pleck, Elizabeth. “ The Making of the Domestic Occasion: The History of Thanksgiving in the United States.” Journal of Social History. 07/1999, Volume 32, Issue 4. 

Thanksgiving in Canada.” The Canadian Encyclopedia.

“The Harvest Home: An Old English Festival Akin to Thanksgiving.” New York Tribune. (Nov 27, 1895): 20.

Gandondagan Seneca Art & Culture Center 

Freida Jacques explains the Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address 

Text of a version of the Haudenosaunee Thanksgiving Address

Iroquois White Corn Project (Don’t forget to order some corn!)

The Haudenosaunee Confederacy 

Oren Lyons tells the story of The Peacemaker & The Tadadaho 

Jack of All Trades: Frederick Law Olmsted

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Frederick Law Olmsted is most well known for being the father of American landscape architecture, but he was also something of a jack-of-all-trades: a sailor, farmer, abolitionist, writer, reformer, public health worker, and conservationist. Join Elizabeth and Dan as they chat about Olmsted’s fascinating life and work!

Correction: Thanks to Zhi Ting Phua of the Buffalo Olmstead Parks Conservancy for pointing out that while The Front does not exist in name, it is still a part of the park system, just now under the name of Front Park.

 

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Show Notes and Further Reading 
Guillet, Travis, Bruce Kelly, and Mary Ellen H. Hern, eds. Art of the Olmsted Landscape. New York: New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission and The Arts Pulisher Inc., 1981.

Johnson, Paul S. Sam Patch, The Famous Jumper. New York: Hill & Wang, 2003.

Kowsky,  Francis R. The Best Planned City in the World: Olmsted, Vaux, and the Buffalo Park System. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2013.

Martin, Justin. Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted. Cambridge: Da Capo Press,  2011.

Mintz, Steven. Moralists and Modernizers: America’s Pre-Civil War Reformers. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1995.

American Accents


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When you produce a podcast, you become hyper-aware of the ways that your fellow hosts speak – those nasally “a” sounds and dropped t’s and g’s really stand out when you’re editing. Where did American accents come from? Dan, Sarah, and Marissa talk about the history of North American accents. (We apologize in advance for our terrible impressions!)

 


 

Show Notes and Further Reading

Dialects of American English

International Dialects of English Archive

“Rful Southern.” Do You Speak American?

Someone Knows Something podcast. CBC.

Edwards, John. “English in Canada.” A Companion to the History of the English Language. Momma, Haruko and Michael Matto (eds). Blackwell Publishing, 2008. Blackwell Reference Online. 10 July 2016 

Enright, Anne. “The Most Irish Island in the World,” The Irish Times 25 Sep 2013 

Fallows, James.  “That Weirdo Announcer Voice Accent: Where It Came From and Why It Went Away,” The Atlantic. 

McDavid, Raven. ‘Postvocalic R in South Carolina: A social analysis’ American Speech 23 (1948):194-203. Reprinted: Dell Hymes, ed., Language in Culture and Society: A reader in linguistics and anthropology, New York: Harper & Row, 1964; A. S. Dil, ed., Varieties of American English: Essays by Raven McDavid, Jr., Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1980.

Mifsud, Rob. “Vowel Movement: How Americans Near the Great Lakes are Radically Changing the Sound of English,” Slate. 

Nosowitz, Dan. “How Capicola Became Gabagool: The Italian New Jersey Accent, Explained,” Atlas Obscura. 

Nosowitz, Dan. “I Made a Linguistics Professor Listen to a Blink-182 Song and Analyze that Accent,” Atlas Obscura. 

Sangster, Catherine. “Received Pronunciation and BBC English,” BBC. 

Schneider, Edgar W. “English in North America.” The Handbook of World Englishes. Kachru, Braj B., Yamuna Kachru and Cecil L. Nelson (eds). Blackwell Publishing, 2006. Blackwell Reference Online.

Sumpter, Althea. “Geechee and Gullah,” New Georgia Encyclopedia. 

Taylor, Trey. “The Rise and Fall of Katharine Hepburn’s Fake Accent,” The Atlantic. 

Turner, Lorenzo Dow. Africanisms in the Gullah Dialect. Columbia: South Carolina Press, 1949.

Wolfram, Walt, and Natalie Schilling-Estes. Hoi Toide on the Outer Banks: The Story of the Ocracoke Brogue. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997. 

Zappa, Moon Unit and Frank Zappa, Valley Girl, 1982

 

ASGA: Utopianisms

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Seas of lemonade, four simultaneous lovers for every woman, and perfectly formulated communities of 810 men and 810 women. Charles Fourier was an idealist, who believed Perfect Harmony could be achieved, if only we better engineered our society. Join Averill, Sarah, and Marissa as they discuss the utopian movements of the 19th century in the U.S., the final installment of our American Second Great Awakening series.

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Show Notes and Further Reading

John Humphrey Noyes and the Oneida Perfectionists.”

The Amana Colonies.” Origin of the Amana

Benedict, Philip. Christ’s Churches Purely Reformed: a Social History of Calvinism. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002.

Burden, Tom. “Utopia.” The Blackwell Dictionary of Modern Social Thought. Blackwell Publishing, 2002.

Delano, Sterling F. Brook Farm: The Dark Side of Utopia. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009.

French, David G and Elena French. Working Communally: Patterns and Possibilities. Russell Sage Foundation, 1975.

Gordon, Jessica. “Transcendental Idea: Social Reform.” American Transcendentalism Web 

Hansan, J. “The Amana Colonies: A Utopian Community.” The Social Welfare History Project

Hill, Christopher. The World Turned Upside Down; Radical Ideas During the English Revolution. New York: Viking Press, 1972.

Jennings, Chris. Paradise Now: The Story of American Utopianism. Random House Publishing, 2016.

Noyes, George Wallingford and Lawrence Foster. Free Love in Utopia: John Humphrey Noyes and the Origin of the Oneida Community. Urbana: University of Chicago Press, 2001.

Weishaupt, Adam. The Illuminati Phalanx. Lulu Press, 2013.

Whitney, Terri. “Hawthorne at Brooke Farm.” Hawthorne in Salem

 

ASGA: Spiritualism in America

In the second part of our Second Great Awakening series, Sarah and Katie talk more about one of the most interesting new religious practices to come out of the Burned Over District – Spiritualism!


Show Notes and Further Reading:

Braude, Ann. Radical Spirits: Spiritualism and Women’s Rights in Nineteenth Century America. Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 2001.

Carlisle, Linda. Elizabeth Packard: A Noble Fight. Champaigne: University of Illinois Press, 2010.

Cox, Robert S. Body and Soul: a Sympathetic History of American Spiritualism. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2003.

Grogan, Susie. “A Solace to a Tortured World: The Growing Interest in Spiritualism During and after Wold War I.”

Hazelgrove, Jenny. Spiritualism and British Society Between the Wars” amd Spiritualism After the Great War. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000.

Winter, Jay.  Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014.

Wright, Ben and Zachary W. Dresser, eds. Apocalypse and the Millenium in the American Civil War. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2013.

 

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Some things we mentioned in the episode:

Stuff You Missed in History Class: The Sisters Fox

National Spiritualist Association of Churches

Lily Dale Assembly

The Zu Füß Podcast

 

America’s Second Great Awakening

Chances are, if you were an American with radical religious ideas, you came from Vermont, and you moved to the “Burned Over District” of New York. Join the History Buffs for Part I of a special three part series exploring America’s Second Great Awakening. In this episode Sarah, Marissa and Katie introduce the Second Great Awakening, and talk about some of the major movements of the period, including Joseph Smith and the Mormons.

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Show Notes & Further Reading

Joseph Smith Welcome Center, Hill Cumorah

“The New York Period of the Mormon Church,” History of Mormonism

Crabtree, Adam. “Animal Magnetism and Mesmerism.” Occult World. Ed. by Christopher Partridge. London: Routledge, 2015.

“George Whitefield: Sensational Evangelist of Britain and America.” Christian History, August 8, 2008. Retrieved 24 March2016

Kidd, Thomas S. The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007.

Juster, Susan. Doomsayers Anglo-American Prophecy in the Age of Revolution. Philadelphia, Pa: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006.

Purvis, Thomas. “Great Awakening, first.” A Dictionary of American History. Blackwell Publishing, 1997. Blackwell Reference Online. 19 May 2016

Purvis, Thomas. “Second Great Awakening.” A Dictionary of American History. Blackwell Publishing, 1997. Blackwell Reference Online. 19 May 2016.

Todras-Whitehill, Ethan. “Mormon Faith and Spectacle at Hill Cumorah in Palmyra, N.Y.New York Times. 27 July 2007.

New York v. Uplinger: Gay Rights at the Supreme Court

In 1983, Buffalonian Bobby Uplinger and his lawyer, Bill Gardner, took Bobby’s case to the U.S. Supreme Court. Bobby had been arrested for making a sexual invitation to an undercover cop, and he and Bill were intent on showing that this case–and the many others like it around the U.S.–was a violation of a gay man’s constitutional rights. In this episode, Averill and Sarah introduce an oral history the History Buffs collected from Bill Gardner about this case. Tune in to learn how Bill and Bobby’s story turned out.

 

Show Notes & Further Reading

William Gardner, Oral History Interview. Conducted by Averill Earls and Elizabeth Garner Masarik on behalf of the Buffalo Oral History Project, 22 November 2015, in the home of William Gardner.

Kennedy, Elizabeth Lapovsky and Madeline D. Davis. Boots of Leather, Slippers of Gold: The History of a Lesbian Community. New York: Routledge, 1993. 

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