Tag Archives: tommy

Selling Vegetarianism

There’s a lot more to vegetarianism than meets the eye. In this episode, Averill, Sarah, and Tommy talk turkey – or, maybe tofurkey? – and graham crackers, the corpses of baby fawns, and the Beef-Steak Chapel. Listen, learn, and laugh with us today on the History Buffs Podcast.

Download this episode (right click and save)

 


 

Show Notes & Further Reading

Berry, Ryan. “From cowherd to cornflakes: the religious roots of modern vegetarianism” Animals’ Agenda v18 i6 Nov 1998.

Collingham, Lizzie Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors. Oxford, UK: University of Oxford Press, 2006.

Johnson, James. The influence of tropical climates on European constitutions, including practical observations on the nature and treatment of the diseases of Europeans on their return from tropical climates. London, UK: Callow Medical Book Seller, 1815.

Maurer, Donna. Vegetarianism: Movement or Moment: Promoting a LIfestyle for Cult Change. Philadelphia: Temple U Press, 2010.

Marranca, Richard. “Vegging out with Kung Fu and Star Trek.” Vegetarian Journal i4 2007.

Sinha, Mrinalini. Colonial Masculinity: The ‘Manly Englishman’ and the’ Effeminate Bengali’ in the Late Nineteenth Century. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 1995.

Streets, Heather. Martial Races: the Military, Race and Masculinity in British Imperial Culture, 1857-1914 (Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2004), 19.

Whorton, James C. “Historical Development of Vegetarianism.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1994.

Remember the 5th of November

Dan, Averill, and Tommy ponder the meaning of a mask, political and religious oppression, and anarchy. Stuff your Fawkes effigy, we’re talking Bonfire Night / Pope Day / Guy Fawkes Day on the podcast!

Download this episode (right click and save)


Show Notes & Further Reading

Gunpowder Plot,” The National Archives

Guy Fawkes,” The History Learning site

Ervin Beck, “Children’s Guy Fawkes Customs in Sheffield” Folklore, Vol. 95, No. 2 (1984), pp. 191-203

Lewis Call, “A is for Anarchy, V is for Vendetta: Images of Guy Fawkes and the Creation of Postmodern Anarchism,” Anarchist Studies 16.2 (2008): 154-172,105.

Damian Carrington, “Gunpowder Plot would have devastated London,” New Scientist, November 5, 2003 

Michael Cottrell, “Green and Orange in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Toronto: The Guy Fawkes’ Day Episode of 1864”  The Canadian Journal of Irish Studies, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Jul., 1993), pp. 12-21

Antonia Fraser, Faith and Treason: The Story of the Gunpowder Plot (New York: Doubleday, 1996)

Megan Lane, “If Guy Fawkes had Succeeded,” BBC News, November 4, 2005

John Pollock, The Popish Plot: A Study in the History of the Reign of Charles II (Duckworth: Great Britain, 1903)

James Sharpe, Remember, Remember: A Cultural History of Guy Fawkes Day Harvard University press, 2005

John N. Wall, Jr. and Terry Bunce Burgin. “This Sermon . . . upon the Gun-Powder Day”: The Book of Homilies of 1547 and Donne’s Sermon in Commemoration of Guy Fawkes’ Day, 1622. South Atlantic Review, Vol. 49, No. 2 (May, 1984), pp. 19-30

Global Nineteenth-Century Revolutions

During seventeen tumultuous years in the mid-19th century, it seemed like the whole world was in chaos. Revolution broke out in Europe, South Asia, East Asia, and the United States. What was going on? Katie, Dan, and Tommy investigate.

 

Show Notes and Further Reading

Ta-Nehisi Coates, “The Civil War Isn’t Tragic,” The Atlantic, April 26, 2011

Christopher Hibbert, The Great Mutiny (1978)

Thomas R. Metcalf, The Aftermath of Revolt (1964)

Jürgen Osterhammel, The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century.  Trans. Patrick Camiller (2014)


Feature images, clockwise from top: Suppression of the Taiping RebellionViennese students during the 1848 revolutionThe British Lion’s Vengeance on the Bengal TigerBombardment of Fort Sumter.  All works in the Public Domain.

GoT PiH: R’hllor & Ahura Mazda

Game of Thrones // Parallels in History Episode 3: R’hllor & Ahura Mazda

Averill, Dan, & Tommy wrap up this years’ Game of Thrones: Parallels in History series with a discussion of the Lord of Light and Zoroastrianism. If you’re looking forward to the premier of the new season tonight, and what the heck is going to happen to Jon Snow, have a listen in – even when we’re delivering knowledge about the similarities shared between the Red Woman’s religion and the ancient Persian Zoroastrian religion, we share some insights into just how the Lord of Light may play a pivotal role in bringing our favorite Stark back to life. If you’re already missing the sixth season of HBO’s Game of Thrones, fill the void with Game of Thrones parallels in history.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


 

Show Notes and Further Reading

Lubin, Timothy. “Zoroastrianism,” Encyclopedia of Modern Asia, 2002.

Fieldhouse, Paul. “Zoroastrianism,” Encyclopedia of Food and Culture, 2003.

Clark, Peter, 1957. Zoroastrianism: An Introduction to an Ancient Faith. Portland, Or: Sussex Academic Press, 1998.

Rose, Jenny. Zoroastrianism. I.B.Tauris, 2014.

Skjærvø, Prods O. The Spirit of Zoroastrianism. New Haven [Conn.]: Yale University Press, 2011.

Choksy, Jamsheed. Zoroastrianism. Encyclopedia of Sex and Gender: Culture Society History, 2007.

 

GoT PiH: The Wall(s)

Game of Thrones // Parallels in History: Episode 1 – The Wall(s)

Special guest Andy Smyser, an expert on ancient Roman history, joins Tommy and Averill to talk about walls – specifically, the Wall separating Westeros from Wildling country, and Hadrian’s Wall separating the tamed Roman parts of Britannia from the wild Scottish lowlands and highlands. The premier of the sixth season of HBO’s Game of Thrones is April 24th – feed your GoT obsession with our discussions of some of the Game of Thrones parallels in history!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


 

Show Notes

Smyser, Andrew. “Religion as Lived Experience.” Masters Thesis, University of Missouri, 2011.

.

Is that lamb made of…butter?!

If you live in the Rust Belt, you may have noticed that Easter brings not only jelly beans and chocolate bunnies to the grocery store but also boxes of butter molded into the shape of lambs.  Does it confuse you?  Do you eat it but have no idea why?  Join Tommy, Dan, and Marissa as they dig into the rollicking history of the butter lamb, just in time for Easter!

Don’t forget to enter to win the Butter Lamb T-shirt! Contest closes 26 March 2016 at 11:59PM EST.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 


Show Notes and Further Reading

Abt, Christina. Chicken Wing Wisdom: Western New York Stories of Family, Life and Food Shared Around the Table. Buffalo, NY: Western New York Wares, 2005.

Division, Alan. The Oxford Companion to Food. 2nd ed. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2006.

Shelton, Brenda K. Reformers in Search of Yesterday: Buffalo in the 1890’s. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1976.

Buffalo’s Broadway Market

Buffalo’s Polish Pioneers

Buffalo “Polonia” at the Turn of the Century

Butter Lambs are Polish Easter Tradition

Malczewski’s Easter Butter Lamb

The Emergence of Dairy Butter

The History of Butter Sculpture Is Strange, Indeed

 

 

Tainted Love: Love Canal and the Fight for Environmental Rights

Welcome to this year’s issue of Tainted Love, our annual installment of unusual love stories just in time for Valentine’s Day!

1978_love_canal_evacuated_house.jpg

An abandoned house in Love Canal, circa 1978 | EPA / Wikimedia Commons

Today, we’re headed just up the road from Buffalo to Love Canal, New York, a small suburban development that made big headlines when toxic chemicals started to appear in residents’ yards.  After a damning health study was released in the summer of 1978, the residents there became arguably the most influential environmental advocates of the late twentieth century.  Join Katie and Tommy as they talk environmental justice from then until now with their guest, Dr. Richard S. Newman.  It’s a Valentine’s Day special, History Buffs style!

 

170px-Love_Canal_protest.jpg

Protests by a Love Canal resident circa 1978 | EPA / Wikimedia Commons

 

As mentioned in the podcast, Dr. Newman will be giving a talk at the Buffalo History Museum on Wednesday, March 23 at 7:30 p.m.  His talk is entitled “Love Canal: A Toxic History,” and comes from his new book, Love Canal: A Toxic History from Colonial Times to the Present.  The book is published by Oxford University press and will be released in April 2016.

 

Abandoned_Streets_in_Love_Canal.jpg

An abandoned street in Love Canal | Public Domain / Wikimedia Commons

Show Notes and Further Reading

Edkardt C. Beck, “The Love Canal Tragedy,” EPA Journal 5.1, 1979, 17-20

Elizabeth Blum, Love Canal Revisited: Race, Class, and Gender in Environmental Activism, Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2008

Nicol Bryan,  Love Canal: Pollution Crisis,  Milwaukee: The World Almanac Library, 2004

Craig E. Colton and Peter N. Skinner, The Road to Love Canal: Managing Industrial Waste before the EPA, Austin: The  University of Texas Press, 1996

Kate Davies, The Rise of the U.S. Environmental Health Movement, Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc, 2013

Nicholas Freudenerg, Not in Our Backyards! Community Action for Health and the Environment, New York: Monthly Review Press, 1984

Lois Gibbs, Love Canal: The Story Continues…., Gabriola Island: New Society Publishers, 1998

Adeline Levine, Love Canal: The Issues and Controversies. Produced through the Educational Communications Center, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, 2013

Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area Remediation of EDA 2 and 3: Final Study Report,  New York State Department of Health and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Albany, May 1991

Ellen Griffith Spears, Baptized in PCBs: Race, Pollution, and Justice in an All-American Town, Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2014


 

Feature image: Valentine’s Tree with Hearts | Johntex / Wikimedia Commons | CC BY 2.5,

 

 

 

« Older Entries