Tag Archives: sexuality

Abortion and Birth Control before Roe v. Wade

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At the Women’s Marches across the U.S. on January 21st, there were hundreds–maybe thousands–of women in their 60s, 70s, and 80s who held up signs that conveyed their frustration with still needing to fight for rights like birth control and abortion. This is a battle that has waged for so, so long. On this episode, Sarah and Elizabeth look back at the late 19th and early 20th century struggle for women’s rights. After our country finally granted women the right to vote in 1920, the emphasis of the women’s rights movement shifted to focus on another issue: access to methods of family limitation.



Show Notes & Further Reading

Jean H. Baker, Margaret Sanger: A Life of Passion (New York: Hill and Wang, 2011).

Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1: An Introduction (Random House Vintage Books Edition, 1980).

Linda Gordon, The Moral Property of Women: A History of Birth Control Politics in America (Chicago, 2002)

Regina Morantz-Sanchez, Conduct Unbecoming a Woman: Medicine on Trial in Turn of the Century Brooklyn (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999)

Diane Sands, “Using Oral History to Chart the Course of Illegal Abortion in Montana,” Frontiers: A Study of Women’s History, Vol. 7, No. 1 (1983)

Huddled Masses: Unwanted Immigrants in the Americas

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America prides itself on being a country of immigrants – after all, everyone in the United States is the descendant of an immigrant, whether forced and free, unless they are Native American. Americans believe that we offer a place of welcome so much that we emblazoned it onto the Statues of Liberty in the form of Emma Lazarus’s poem, The New Colossus, with those famous lines about the poor, tired, and huddled masses. But like most things in history, the real story is a lot more complicated. Join Averill, Marissa, and Sarah as they talk about the history of those who were turned away at the gates.

Show Notes & Further Reading: 

Baynton, Douglas. Defectives in the Land: Disability and Immigration in the Age of Eugenics. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016).

Canaday, Margot. The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009.

Canaday, Margot. “”Who is a Homosexual?”: The Consolidation of Sexual Identities in Mid-Twentieth-Century American Immigration Law.” Law & Social Inquiry, vol. 28, no. 2, 2003., pp. 351-386. 

Leavitt, Judith Walzer. Typhoid Mary: Captive to the Public’s Health. Boston: Beacon Press, 1997.

Turner, Adam. “Paranoia on the Border: Immigration and Public Health.” Nursing Clio, July 2014.

Jazz Cleopatra

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The dizzying and exciting Jazz Age – that glittering period between the end of World War I and the onset of the global Great Depression – is captured best by Europe’s most beloved American performer: Josephine Baker, the “Jazz Cleopatra.” Born in the Jim Crow South, Baker became the most famous performer of the age, beloved in Europe but largely rejected in her home country. Join Marissa, Sarah, and Averill as they talk about everything from sexy bananas to primitivism in an effort to better understand this modern Cleopatra and her age.

 


Show Notes and Further Reading

Patrick O’Connor. “Josephine Baker.” American National Biography Online

Schroeder, Alan and Heather Lehr Wagner. Josephine Baker: Entertainer. New York: Chelsea House, 2006, 81.

Jules-Rosette, Bennetta, Josephine Baker in Art and Life: The Icon and the Image. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2007, 224.

Caravantes, Peggy. The Many Faces of Josephine Baker: Dancer, Singer, Activist, Spy. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2015, 151.

Wintz, Cary D. and Paul Finkleman, eds.. Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance.  New York: Routledge, 2000.

Saunders, Thomas J. “The Jazz Age.” A Companion to Europe 1900–1945. Martel, Gordon (ed). Blackwell Publishing, 2005. Blackwell Reference Online. 16 June 2016

Woloch, Nancy. “The Changing Status of Women 1900–1950.” A Companion to the Modern American Novel 1900–1950. Matthews, John T. Blackwell Publishing, 2009. Blackwell Reference Online.

East St. Louis Riot

Cerchiari, Luca, Laurent Cugny, and Franz Kerschbaumer. Eurojazzland. Boston: Northwestern University Press, 2012.

Alicja Sowinska, “Dialects of the Banana Skirt

The Covert History of the American Condom

 Paul Gauguin and Primitivist Modernism or Pursuit of the “Natural”

ASGA: Utopianisms

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Seas of lemonade, four simultaneous lovers for every woman, and perfectly formulated communities of 810 men and 810 women. Charles Fourier was an idealist, who believed Perfect Harmony could be achieved, if only we better engineered our society. Join Averill, Sarah, and Marissa as they discuss the utopian movements of the 19th century in the U.S., the final installment of our American Second Great Awakening series.

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Show Notes and Further Reading

John Humphrey Noyes and the Oneida Perfectionists.”

The Amana Colonies.” Origin of the Amana

Benedict, Philip. Christ’s Churches Purely Reformed: a Social History of Calvinism. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002.

Burden, Tom. “Utopia.” The Blackwell Dictionary of Modern Social Thought. Blackwell Publishing, 2002.

Delano, Sterling F. Brook Farm: The Dark Side of Utopia. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009.

French, David G and Elena French. Working Communally: Patterns and Possibilities. Russell Sage Foundation, 1975.

Gordon, Jessica. “Transcendental Idea: Social Reform.” American Transcendentalism Web 

Hansan, J. “The Amana Colonies: A Utopian Community.” The Social Welfare History Project

Hill, Christopher. The World Turned Upside Down; Radical Ideas During the English Revolution. New York: Viking Press, 1972.

Jennings, Chris. Paradise Now: The Story of American Utopianism. Random House Publishing, 2016.

Noyes, George Wallingford and Lawrence Foster. Free Love in Utopia: John Humphrey Noyes and the Origin of the Oneida Community. Urbana: University of Chicago Press, 2001.

Weishaupt, Adam. The Illuminati Phalanx. Lulu Press, 2013.

Whitney, Terri. “Hawthorne at Brooke Farm.” Hawthorne in Salem