Tag Archives: religion

Selling Vegetarianism

There’s a lot more to vegetarianism than meets the eye. In this episode, Averill, Sarah, and Tommy talk turkey – or, maybe tofurkey? – and graham crackers, the corpses of baby fawns, and the Beef-Steak Chapel. Listen, learn, and laugh with us today on the History Buffs Podcast.

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Show Notes & Further Reading

Berry, Ryan. “From cowherd to cornflakes: the religious roots of modern vegetarianism” Animals’ Agenda v18 i6 Nov 1998.

Collingham, Lizzie Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors. Oxford, UK: University of Oxford Press, 2006.

Johnson, James. The influence of tropical climates on European constitutions, including practical observations on the nature and treatment of the diseases of Europeans on their return from tropical climates. London, UK: Callow Medical Book Seller, 1815.

Maurer, Donna. Vegetarianism: Movement or Moment: Promoting a LIfestyle for Cult Change. Philadelphia: Temple U Press, 2010.

Marranca, Richard. “Vegging out with Kung Fu and Star Trek.” Vegetarian Journal i4 2007.

Sinha, Mrinalini. Colonial Masculinity: The ‘Manly Englishman’ and the’ Effeminate Bengali’ in the Late Nineteenth Century. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 1995.

Streets, Heather. Martial Races: the Military, Race and Masculinity in British Imperial Culture, 1857-1914 (Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2004), 19.

Whorton, James C. “Historical Development of Vegetarianism.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1994.

Remember the 5th of November

Dan, Averill, and Tommy ponder the meaning of a mask, political and religious oppression, and anarchy. Stuff your Fawkes effigy, we’re talking Bonfire Night / Pope Day / Guy Fawkes Day on the podcast!

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Show Notes & Further Reading

Gunpowder Plot,” The National Archives

Guy Fawkes,” The History Learning site

Ervin Beck, “Children’s Guy Fawkes Customs in Sheffield” Folklore, Vol. 95, No. 2 (1984), pp. 191-203

Lewis Call, “A is for Anarchy, V is for Vendetta: Images of Guy Fawkes and the Creation of Postmodern Anarchism,” Anarchist Studies 16.2 (2008): 154-172,105.

Damian Carrington, “Gunpowder Plot would have devastated London,” New Scientist, November 5, 2003 

Michael Cottrell, “Green and Orange in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Toronto: The Guy Fawkes’ Day Episode of 1864”  The Canadian Journal of Irish Studies, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Jul., 1993), pp. 12-21

Antonia Fraser, Faith and Treason: The Story of the Gunpowder Plot (New York: Doubleday, 1996)

Megan Lane, “If Guy Fawkes had Succeeded,” BBC News, November 4, 2005

John Pollock, The Popish Plot: A Study in the History of the Reign of Charles II (Duckworth: Great Britain, 1903)

James Sharpe, Remember, Remember: A Cultural History of Guy Fawkes Day Harvard University press, 2005

John N. Wall, Jr. and Terry Bunce Burgin. “This Sermon . . . upon the Gun-Powder Day”: The Book of Homilies of 1547 and Donne’s Sermon in Commemoration of Guy Fawkes’ Day, 1622. South Atlantic Review, Vol. 49, No. 2 (May, 1984), pp. 19-30

Latter-Day Saints in the Pacific


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Fun fact: the very popular Polynesian Cultural Center, which boasts six “villages” highlighting “traditional” dress, dance, music, arts and crafts, and other practices of indigenous Pacific Islander culture, is owned and operated by the Church of the Latter-Day Saints. Now, the LDS church was born and bred in the eastern United States, before ultimately setting up basecamp in Utah. Like many places in the US and the world, they sent missionaries to the Pacific Islands, but other than that, they don’t have any particular claim over Polynesian culture. So it might strike one as curious that this is what’s up. Join Averill and Katie as they talk about the particular efficacy of the Mormon spread, it’s growth in the Pacific Islands, and the fine line between educational tourism and exploitative mass culture.


Show Notes and Further Reading

Raibmon, Paige S., Authentic Indians: episodes of encounter from the late-nineteenth-century Northwest coast, Duke University Press, Durham, 2005.

Sonne, Conway B. Saints on the seas: a maritime history of Mormon migration, 1830-1890, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, 1983.

All of Polynesia, Your WayPolynesian Cultural Center, accessed 10 Aug 2016

HistoryPolynesian Cultural Center,  accessed 10 Aug 2016

Part Time Job Openings,” Polynesian Cultural Center, accessed 10 Aug 2016

 

Feature Image: Front of Polynesian Cultural Center, Wikimedia Commons

GoT PiH: R’hllor & Ahura Mazda

Game of Thrones // Parallels in History Episode 3: R’hllor & Ahura Mazda

Averill, Dan, & Tommy wrap up this years’ Game of Thrones: Parallels in History series with a discussion of the Lord of Light and Zoroastrianism. If you’re looking forward to the premier of the new season tonight, and what the heck is going to happen to Jon Snow, have a listen in – even when we’re delivering knowledge about the similarities shared between the Red Woman’s religion and the ancient Persian Zoroastrian religion, we share some insights into just how the Lord of Light may play a pivotal role in bringing our favorite Stark back to life. If you’re already missing the sixth season of HBO’s Game of Thrones, fill the void with Game of Thrones parallels in history.

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Show Notes and Further Reading

Lubin, Timothy. “Zoroastrianism,” Encyclopedia of Modern Asia, 2002.

Fieldhouse, Paul. “Zoroastrianism,” Encyclopedia of Food and Culture, 2003.

Clark, Peter, 1957. Zoroastrianism: An Introduction to an Ancient Faith. Portland, Or: Sussex Academic Press, 1998.

Rose, Jenny. Zoroastrianism. I.B.Tauris, 2014.

Skjærvø, Prods O. The Spirit of Zoroastrianism. New Haven [Conn.]: Yale University Press, 2011.

Choksy, Jamsheed. Zoroastrianism. Encyclopedia of Sex and Gender: Culture Society History, 2007.