Tag Archives: marissa

Fascism and Uteruses


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There are some fascinating parallels between the deployment of eugenic policies around reproduction and women’s bodies in twentieth-century Germany and Japan. In this episode, the fourth in the HBP’s work on reproductive rights and fights in history (from the US to the world). Marissa and Averill tackle eugenics, Nazis, legalized abortion and illegal hormonal birth control, marriage counseling, and more. It’s a story of governments trying to dictate how women can or cannot use their uteruses. Enjoy?


Show Notes & Further Reading

Anita Grossman, Reforming Sex (Oxford University Press, 1995)

Volker Roelcke, Sascha Topp, and Etienne Lepicard, eds., Silence, Scapegoats, Self-Reflection: The Shadow of Nazi Medical Crimes on Medicine and Bioethics (Göttingen: V&r Unipress, 2015).

Dagmar Herzog, Sex after Fascism: Memory and Morality in 20th Century Germany (Princeton University Press: Princeton; 2007).

Mark Roseman, Devin Pendas, and Richard F. Wetzell, Beyond the Racial State (Indiana University Press: Bloomington, IN; 2008).

Christiana A. E. Norgren, Abortion Before Birth Control: The Politics of Reproduction in Postwar Japan (Newark: Princeton University Press, 2001).

Samuel Coleman, Family Planning in Japanese Society: Traditional Birth Control in a Modern Urban Culture (Princeton University Press, 1992)

Takeda Hiroko, The Political Economy of Reproduction in Japan (Routledge, Sep 23, 2004)

Huddled Masses: Unwanted Immigrants in the Americas

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America prides itself on being a country of immigrants – after all, everyone in the United States is the descendant of an immigrant, whether forced and free, unless they are Native American. Americans believe that we offer a place of welcome so much that we emblazoned it onto the Statues of Liberty in the form of Emma Lazarus’s poem, The New Colossus, with those famous lines about the poor, tired, and huddled masses. But like most things in history, the real story is a lot more complicated. Join Averill, Marissa, and Sarah as they talk about the history of those who were turned away at the gates.

Show Notes & Further Reading: 

Baynton, Douglas. Defectives in the Land: Disability and Immigration in the Age of Eugenics. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016).

Canaday, Margot. The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009.

Canaday, Margot. “”Who is a Homosexual?”: The Consolidation of Sexual Identities in Mid-Twentieth-Century American Immigration Law.” Law & Social Inquiry, vol. 28, no. 2, 2003., pp. 351-386. 

Leavitt, Judith Walzer. Typhoid Mary: Captive to the Public’s Health. Boston: Beacon Press, 1997.

Turner, Adam. “Paranoia on the Border: Immigration and Public Health.” Nursing Clio, July 2014.

Family Limitation in the Pre-Modern World

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In the wake of the Global Gag Rule that the U.S. President just issued in his first week in office, there is really no better time to start talking about the history of family limitation in all of its iterations across time and space – from various contraceptives invented by the ancient Egyptians to the many herbal remedies employed by midwives and women generally to “restore the menses” to a broader discussion of when and where states have attempted to control the reproductive feature of women’s bodies. This episode is just the first of many more to come addressing these very issues of women’s reproductive health and rights. Join Marissa and Averill as they dive into the wild, weird, and sometimes dangerous methods of family limitation in the pre-modern world.

Show Notes & Further Reading

Edwards,Stassa. “The History of Abortifacients.” Jezebel. 18 Nov 2014.

Biddlecom, Ann E. “Family Planning, Abortion, and Reproductive Health.” The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology. Ritzer, George (ed). Blackwell Publishing, 2007.

Brick, P. 2003. “The Encyclopedia of Birth Control, Edited by Vern L. Bullough”. JOURNAL OF SEX RESEARCH. 40: 315.

Hardacre, Helen. Marketing the Menacing Fetus in Japan. Berkeley, Calif: University of California Press, 1999.

Hoffer, Peter Charles, and N. E. H. Hull. Murdering Mothers: Infanticide in England and New England, 1558-1803. New York: New York University Press, 1984.

James, Peter, and I. J. Thorpe. Ancient Inventions. 1994.

Poston, Dudley L. Fertility, Family Planning, and Population Policy in China. London: Routledge, 2006.

Riddle, John M. Contraception and Abortion from the Ancient World to the Renaissance. 1992.

Unschuld, Paul, and Jinsheng Zheng. Chinese Traditional Healing (3 Vols.) The Berlin Collections of Manuscript Volumes from the 16th Through the Early 20th Century. Leiden: BRILL, 2012

Wiesner, Merry E. Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008.

Zheng, Tiantian. Ethnographies of Prostitution in Contemporary China: Gender Relations, HIV/AIDS, and Nationalism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009

Immunizations and Anti-Vax Movements

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Vaccination has been a controversial subject and we tend to think that this is a new phenomenon. Proponents of vaccination blame anti-vax parents for the recent cropping-up of preventable (and formerly eliminated) diseases such as the NYC measles outbreak in 2014, and the return of Pertussis in 2015. While parents who oppose vaccination or those who believe in vaccine choice are suspicious of the CDC’s rigorous vaccine schedule, “Big Pharma,” and the possibility of vaccine injury due to questionable ingredients. But this is NOT new. Debate and conflict have existed around the use and efficacy of immunizations since the practice first came into use. This episode considers the history of immunization and its opponents.

Show Notes and Further Reading:

Arthur Boylston, “The Origins of Inoculation,” Journal of the Royal Society of MedicineJuly 2012

Daniel R. Bronfin, Childhood Immunization Controversies: What are Parents Asking?”, The Ochsner Journal, Fall 2008

Carole Emberton, “The Minister of Death,” The New York Times Opinionator BlogAugust 17, 2012

Amy Lynn Filsinger & Raymond Dwek,George Washington and the First Mass Military Inoculation,” The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress.

“History of Anti-Vaccination Movements,” The History of VaccinesJanuary 25, 2016

Humphries, Margaret. The Marrow of Tragedy: The Health Crisis of the American Civil War (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins, 2013).

Charlotte DeCroes Jacobs, “Vaccinations Have Always Been Controversial in America,” Time Magazine, July 31, 2015

Robert Middlekauff, The Mathers: Three Generations of Puritan Intellectuals, 1596-1728. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

Terry Reimer, “Smallpox and Vaccination in the Civil War,” The National Museum of Civil War Medicine November 9, 2004

Stefan Riedel, “Edward Jenner and the History of Smallpox and Vaccination,” Baylor University Medical Center Proceedings January 2005

Mariana Zapata, “How Civil Wars Gave Themselves Syphilis While Trying to Avoid Smallpox,” Atlas ObscuraNovember 30, 2016.


Featured image: An 1802 illustration depicts Edward Jenner vaccinating a young woman. (National Museum of Medicine)

Jazz Cleopatra

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The dizzying and exciting Jazz Age – that glittering period between the end of World War I and the onset of the global Great Depression – is captured best by Europe’s most beloved American performer: Josephine Baker, the “Jazz Cleopatra.” Born in the Jim Crow South, Baker became the most famous performer of the age, beloved in Europe but largely rejected in her home country. Join Marissa, Sarah, and Averill as they talk about everything from sexy bananas to primitivism in an effort to better understand this modern Cleopatra and her age.

 


Show Notes and Further Reading

Patrick O’Connor. “Josephine Baker.” American National Biography Online

Schroeder, Alan and Heather Lehr Wagner. Josephine Baker: Entertainer. New York: Chelsea House, 2006, 81.

Jules-Rosette, Bennetta, Josephine Baker in Art and Life: The Icon and the Image. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2007, 224.

Caravantes, Peggy. The Many Faces of Josephine Baker: Dancer, Singer, Activist, Spy. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2015, 151.

Wintz, Cary D. and Paul Finkleman, eds.. Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance.  New York: Routledge, 2000.

Saunders, Thomas J. “The Jazz Age.” A Companion to Europe 1900–1945. Martel, Gordon (ed). Blackwell Publishing, 2005. Blackwell Reference Online. 16 June 2016

Woloch, Nancy. “The Changing Status of Women 1900–1950.” A Companion to the Modern American Novel 1900–1950. Matthews, John T. Blackwell Publishing, 2009. Blackwell Reference Online.

East St. Louis Riot

Cerchiari, Luca, Laurent Cugny, and Franz Kerschbaumer. Eurojazzland. Boston: Northwestern University Press, 2012.

Alicja Sowinska, “Dialects of the Banana Skirt

The Covert History of the American Condom

 Paul Gauguin and Primitivist Modernism or Pursuit of the “Natural”

Insanity on Trial

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The criminal culpability of people with mental illness has long been hotly debated. Recently, the “insanity defense” has received particular scrutiny as John W. Hinckley, who shot President Ronald Reagan and members of his staff in 1981, has been released from the inpatient mental facility where he has lived since 1982. Many, including Reagan’s family members, think the insanity defense Hinckley used allowed him to get off without facing the consequences of his actions. This got us wondering: where did the insanity defense come from? Join Marissa, Sarah and Averill as they talk about crime, mental illness, and the law.

 

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Show Notes and Further Reading 

Asmar, Melanie. “What happens when accused killers plead insanity?” Westward, February 6, 2014. 

Data, Vivek. “When Homosexuality Came Out (of the DSM).” Mad in America 1 Dec 2014. 

Collins, Kimberly, Gabe Hinkebein, and Staci Schorgl (3Ls), “The John Hinckley Trial and Its Effects on the Insanity Defense.”

Ford, Dana. “Judge orders Texas teen Ethan Couch to rehab for driving drunk, killing 4,” CNN 6 Feb 2014. 

Greyhound Bus Killer Found Not Criminally Responsible,” CBC News. 

Hannah, Jim. “Teen won’t claim mental illness in murder trial.” Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, 11 Jan 2011

Jewett, Brandi. “Finley woman accused of murder claims mental illness.” Grand Forks Herald  May 7, 2014. 

Kenneally, Thomas. American Scoundrel: The Life of Notorious Civil War General Dan Sickles. New York: Anchor Books, 2003.

Lennard, Natasha.  “‘He is sane’: James Holmes’ trial showed that the insanity plea is a mess,Fusion.net  July 17, 2015. 

Lopez, Christina. “Mom Accused of Drowning Girl Wins With Insanity Defense; Now, Can She Re-Enter Society?”  ABC News  January 27, 2013.

Martin, John P. “The Insanity Defense: A Closer Look,” The Washington Post February 27, 1998. 

Matejkowski, Jason C. MSW, Sara W. Cullen, MSW, and Phyllis L. Solomon, PhD, “Characteristics of Persons With Severe Mental Illness Who Have Been Incarcerated for Murder,” J Am Acad Psychiatry Law 36:74 – 86, 2008

Parker, Sam. “Determination of Insanity in Criminal Cases,” Cornell Law Review Volume 26, Issue 3 April 1941. 

Rosenberg, Charles. The Trial of the Assassin Guiteau: Psychiatry and the Law in the Gilded Age. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995.

Saxton, Martha. Being Good: Women’s Moral Values in Early America. New York: Hill and Wang, 2003.

Utah law found excuses for homosexual institutionalization” 26 Oct 2012. 

U.S. Supreme Court Decision on Insanity Defense: Clark v. Arizona,” Treatment Advocacy Cente 


 

Feature Image: Modified by Averill Earls; Original image Harper’s Weekly engraving of the Dan Sickles murder trial in Washington, D.C., 1859.

American Accents


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When you produce a podcast, you become hyper-aware of the ways that your fellow hosts speak – those nasally “a” sounds and dropped t’s and g’s really stand out when you’re editing. Where did American accents come from? Dan, Sarah, and Marissa talk about the history of North American accents. (We apologize in advance for our terrible impressions!)

 


 

Show Notes and Further Reading

Dialects of American English

International Dialects of English Archive

“Rful Southern.” Do You Speak American?

Someone Knows Something podcast. CBC.

Edwards, John. “English in Canada.” A Companion to the History of the English Language. Momma, Haruko and Michael Matto (eds). Blackwell Publishing, 2008. Blackwell Reference Online. 10 July 2016 

Enright, Anne. “The Most Irish Island in the World,” The Irish Times 25 Sep 2013 

Fallows, James.  “That Weirdo Announcer Voice Accent: Where It Came From and Why It Went Away,” The Atlantic. 

McDavid, Raven. ‘Postvocalic R in South Carolina: A social analysis’ American Speech 23 (1948):194-203. Reprinted: Dell Hymes, ed., Language in Culture and Society: A reader in linguistics and anthropology, New York: Harper & Row, 1964; A. S. Dil, ed., Varieties of American English: Essays by Raven McDavid, Jr., Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1980.

Mifsud, Rob. “Vowel Movement: How Americans Near the Great Lakes are Radically Changing the Sound of English,” Slate. 

Nosowitz, Dan. “How Capicola Became Gabagool: The Italian New Jersey Accent, Explained,” Atlas Obscura. 

Nosowitz, Dan. “I Made a Linguistics Professor Listen to a Blink-182 Song and Analyze that Accent,” Atlas Obscura. 

Sangster, Catherine. “Received Pronunciation and BBC English,” BBC. 

Schneider, Edgar W. “English in North America.” The Handbook of World Englishes. Kachru, Braj B., Yamuna Kachru and Cecil L. Nelson (eds). Blackwell Publishing, 2006. Blackwell Reference Online.

Sumpter, Althea. “Geechee and Gullah,” New Georgia Encyclopedia. 

Taylor, Trey. “The Rise and Fall of Katharine Hepburn’s Fake Accent,” The Atlantic. 

Turner, Lorenzo Dow. Africanisms in the Gullah Dialect. Columbia: South Carolina Press, 1949.

Wolfram, Walt, and Natalie Schilling-Estes. Hoi Toide on the Outer Banks: The Story of the Ocracoke Brogue. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997. 

Zappa, Moon Unit and Frank Zappa, Valley Girl, 1982

 

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