Tag Archives: katie

How America Got Its Bases

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It should come as no surprise that the American military has bases all over the world in strategically important places.  But how did we obtain them, especially those ones that exist in the middle of other sovereign nations?  Join Averill, Katie, and Dan as they discuss American base acquisition in this week’s episode of the History Buffs Podcast.

Show Notes and Further Reading

Diego Garcia:

Diego Garcia Islanders Displaced in U.K. Failure Hope to Return Home,” NPR, April 16, 2015

Scott Foster and Robert Windrem, “Tsunami Spares U.S. Base in Diego Garcia,” NBC News, January 4, 2005

Joshua L. Harris, “U.S. Military Presence in Diego Garcia: National Interests vs. Human Rights,” ICE Case Studies No. 120, December 2003

David Vine, “The Truth About Diego Garcia,” The Huffington Post, June 15, 2015

David Vine, Island of Shame: The Secret History of the U.S. Military Base on Diego Garcia, Princeton University Press, 2011

Guantanamo Bay:

Copy of checks sent to Cuba

The United States, Cuba, and the Platt Amendment, 1901,” Office of the Historian

Agreement Between the United States and Cuba for the Lease of Lands for Coaling and Naval stations, February 23, 1903Yale Law School Avalon Project 

The Case for CLosing – and Keeping Open – Guantanamo,” NPR (6 Mar 2016)

Jess Bravin, The Terror Courts (Yale University Press, 2013) 

Philip Ewing, “Fact Check: Is Obama Handing Guantanamo Bay Back to Cuba?NPR (Feb 25, 2016) 

Alyssa Fetini, “A Brief History of Gitmo,” Time (12 Nov 2008) 

Jeannette L. Nolen, “Guantanamo Bay detention camp,” Encyclopedia Britannica (Updated 22 May 2013)

Michael J. Strauss, The Leasing of Guantanamo Bay (ABC-CLIO, May 14, 2009)


Featured image: Panorama showing 1st, 2nd & 3rd Regiments, U.S. Marines, Deer Point Camp, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, April 26, 1911 (Library of Congress)

Immunizations and Anti-Vax Movements

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Vaccination has been a controversial subject and we tend to think that this is a new phenomenon. Proponents of vaccination blame anti-vax parents for the recent cropping-up of preventable (and formerly eliminated) diseases such as the NYC measles outbreak in 2014, and the return of Pertussis in 2015. While parents who oppose vaccination or those who believe in vaccine choice are suspicious of the CDC’s rigorous vaccine schedule, “Big Pharma,” and the possibility of vaccine injury due to questionable ingredients. But this is NOT new. Debate and conflict have existed around the use and efficacy of immunizations since the practice first came into use. This episode considers the history of immunization and its opponents.

Show Notes and Further Reading:

Arthur Boylston, “The Origins of Inoculation,” Journal of the Royal Society of MedicineJuly 2012

Daniel R. Bronfin, Childhood Immunization Controversies: What are Parents Asking?”, The Ochsner Journal, Fall 2008

Carole Emberton, “The Minister of Death,” The New York Times Opinionator BlogAugust 17, 2012

Amy Lynn Filsinger & Raymond Dwek,George Washington and the First Mass Military Inoculation,” The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress.

“History of Anti-Vaccination Movements,” The History of VaccinesJanuary 25, 2016

Humphries, Margaret. The Marrow of Tragedy: The Health Crisis of the American Civil War (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins, 2013).

Charlotte DeCroes Jacobs, “Vaccinations Have Always Been Controversial in America,” Time Magazine, July 31, 2015

Robert Middlekauff, The Mathers: Three Generations of Puritan Intellectuals, 1596-1728. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

Terry Reimer, “Smallpox and Vaccination in the Civil War,” The National Museum of Civil War Medicine November 9, 2004

Stefan Riedel, “Edward Jenner and the History of Smallpox and Vaccination,” Baylor University Medical Center Proceedings January 2005

Mariana Zapata, “How Civil Wars Gave Themselves Syphilis While Trying to Avoid Smallpox,” Atlas ObscuraNovember 30, 2016.


Featured image: An 1802 illustration depicts Edward Jenner vaccinating a young woman. (National Museum of Medicine)

Cash in a Bag

Today we’re talking about corruption in American politics.  And honestly, is there a better time to talk about this topic than now?  Join Elizabeth and Katie as they discuss some scintillating political scandals in U.S. politics.

Speaking of politics, have you registered to vote yet?

tammany


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Featured image:  Harry F. Sinclair, multimillionaire oil magnate (left) and his counsel Martin W. Littleton. Teapot Dome hearing. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-hec-44031

Tammany Hall:  A rational law, or – Tammany // C.J. Taylor. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-7884

Women, War and Bananas

The combination doesn’t really seem to make much sense, we know – but you’ll see the connections soon! Join Katie and Sarah as they explore the fascinating, interconnected worlds of gender, war, colonialism and religion in Latin America.

rigoberta_menchu_2009_cropped

Rigoberta Menchu, 2009 / Wikimedia Commons

 


Further Reading and Show Notes 

“Guerillas in Latin America: Domestic and International Roles.” Journal of Peace Research 43 (May 2006): 313-329.

Kampwirth, Karen. Women and Guerilla Movements. Nicaragua, El Salvador, Chiapas, Cuba. State College: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2002.

Menchu, Rigoberta. I, Rigoberta Menchu. (London: Verso, 1983).

Reif, Linda L. “Women in Latin American Guerilla Movements: A Comparative Perspective. Comparative Politics 18 (January 1986): 147-169.

Rigoberta Menchu Tum, Nobelprize.org

 

Latter-Day Saints in the Pacific


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Fun fact: the very popular Polynesian Cultural Center, which boasts six “villages” highlighting “traditional” dress, dance, music, arts and crafts, and other practices of indigenous Pacific Islander culture, is owned and operated by the Church of the Latter-Day Saints. Now, the LDS church was born and bred in the eastern United States, before ultimately setting up basecamp in Utah. Like many places in the US and the world, they sent missionaries to the Pacific Islands, but other than that, they don’t have any particular claim over Polynesian culture. So it might strike one as curious that this is what’s up. Join Averill and Katie as they talk about the particular efficacy of the Mormon spread, it’s growth in the Pacific Islands, and the fine line between educational tourism and exploitative mass culture.


Show Notes and Further Reading

Raibmon, Paige S., Authentic Indians: episodes of encounter from the late-nineteenth-century Northwest coast, Duke University Press, Durham, 2005.

Sonne, Conway B. Saints on the seas: a maritime history of Mormon migration, 1830-1890, University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, 1983.

All of Polynesia, Your WayPolynesian Cultural Center, accessed 10 Aug 2016

HistoryPolynesian Cultural Center,  accessed 10 Aug 2016

Part Time Job Openings,” Polynesian Cultural Center, accessed 10 Aug 2016

 

Feature Image: Front of Polynesian Cultural Center, Wikimedia Commons

ASGA: Spiritualism in America

In the second part of our Second Great Awakening series, Sarah and Katie talk more about one of the most interesting new religious practices to come out of the Burned Over District – Spiritualism!


Show Notes and Further Reading:

Braude, Ann. Radical Spirits: Spiritualism and Women’s Rights in Nineteenth Century America. Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 2001.

Carlisle, Linda. Elizabeth Packard: A Noble Fight. Champaigne: University of Illinois Press, 2010.

Cox, Robert S. Body and Soul: a Sympathetic History of American Spiritualism. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2003.

Grogan, Susie. “A Solace to a Tortured World: The Growing Interest in Spiritualism During and after Wold War I.”

Hazelgrove, Jenny. Spiritualism and British Society Between the Wars” amd Spiritualism After the Great War. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000.

Winter, Jay.  Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014.

Wright, Ben and Zachary W. Dresser, eds. Apocalypse and the Millenium in the American Civil War. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2013.

 

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Some things we mentioned in the episode:

Stuff You Missed in History Class: The Sisters Fox

National Spiritualist Association of Churches

Lily Dale Assembly

The Zu Füß Podcast

 

America’s Second Great Awakening

Chances are, if you were an American with radical religious ideas, you came from Vermont, and you moved to the “Burned Over District” of New York. Join the History Buffs for Part I of a special three part series exploring America’s Second Great Awakening. In this episode Sarah, Marissa and Katie introduce the Second Great Awakening, and talk about some of the major movements of the period, including Joseph Smith and the Mormons.

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Show Notes & Further Reading

Joseph Smith Welcome Center, Hill Cumorah

“The New York Period of the Mormon Church,” History of Mormonism

Crabtree, Adam. “Animal Magnetism and Mesmerism.” Occult World. Ed. by Christopher Partridge. London: Routledge, 2015.

“George Whitefield: Sensational Evangelist of Britain and America.” Christian History, August 8, 2008. Retrieved 24 March2016

Kidd, Thomas S. The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007.

Juster, Susan. Doomsayers Anglo-American Prophecy in the Age of Revolution. Philadelphia, Pa: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006.

Purvis, Thomas. “Great Awakening, first.” A Dictionary of American History. Blackwell Publishing, 1997. Blackwell Reference Online. 19 May 2016

Purvis, Thomas. “Second Great Awakening.” A Dictionary of American History. Blackwell Publishing, 1997. Blackwell Reference Online. 19 May 2016.

Todras-Whitehill, Ethan. “Mormon Faith and Spectacle at Hill Cumorah in Palmyra, N.Y.New York Times. 27 July 2007.

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