Tag Archives: histsex

Huddled Masses: Unwanted Immigrants in the Americas

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America prides itself on being a country of immigrants – after all, everyone in the United States is the descendant of an immigrant, whether forced and free, unless they are Native American. Americans believe that we offer a place of welcome so much that we emblazoned it onto the Statues of Liberty in the form of Emma Lazarus’s poem, The New Colossus, with those famous lines about the poor, tired, and huddled masses. But like most things in history, the real story is a lot more complicated. Join Averill, Marissa, and Sarah as they talk about the history of those who were turned away at the gates.

Show Notes & Further Reading: 

Baynton, Douglas. Defectives in the Land: Disability and Immigration in the Age of Eugenics. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016).

Canaday, Margot. The Straight State: Sexuality and Citizenship in Twentieth-Century America. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2009.

Canaday, Margot. “”Who is a Homosexual?”: The Consolidation of Sexual Identities in Mid-Twentieth-Century American Immigration Law.” Law & Social Inquiry, vol. 28, no. 2, 2003., pp. 351-386. 

Leavitt, Judith Walzer. Typhoid Mary: Captive to the Public’s Health. Boston: Beacon Press, 1997.

Turner, Adam. “Paranoia on the Border: Immigration and Public Health.” Nursing Clio, July 2014.

Jazz Cleopatra

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The dizzying and exciting Jazz Age – that glittering period between the end of World War I and the onset of the global Great Depression – is captured best by Europe’s most beloved American performer: Josephine Baker, the “Jazz Cleopatra.” Born in the Jim Crow South, Baker became the most famous performer of the age, beloved in Europe but largely rejected in her home country. Join Marissa, Sarah, and Averill as they talk about everything from sexy bananas to primitivism in an effort to better understand this modern Cleopatra and her age.

 


Show Notes and Further Reading

Patrick O’Connor. “Josephine Baker.” American National Biography Online

Schroeder, Alan and Heather Lehr Wagner. Josephine Baker: Entertainer. New York: Chelsea House, 2006, 81.

Jules-Rosette, Bennetta, Josephine Baker in Art and Life: The Icon and the Image. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2007, 224.

Caravantes, Peggy. The Many Faces of Josephine Baker: Dancer, Singer, Activist, Spy. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2015, 151.

Wintz, Cary D. and Paul Finkleman, eds.. Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance.  New York: Routledge, 2000.

Saunders, Thomas J. “The Jazz Age.” A Companion to Europe 1900–1945. Martel, Gordon (ed). Blackwell Publishing, 2005. Blackwell Reference Online. 16 June 2016

Woloch, Nancy. “The Changing Status of Women 1900–1950.” A Companion to the Modern American Novel 1900–1950. Matthews, John T. Blackwell Publishing, 2009. Blackwell Reference Online.

East St. Louis Riot

Cerchiari, Luca, Laurent Cugny, and Franz Kerschbaumer. Eurojazzland. Boston: Northwestern University Press, 2012.

Alicja Sowinska, “Dialects of the Banana Skirt

The Covert History of the American Condom

 Paul Gauguin and Primitivist Modernism or Pursuit of the “Natural”

Gay & Irish on St. Paddy’s Day in the US

Each year since 1990, the Irish-American Gay and Lesbian Organization of New York City has requested to march in the NYC St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Each year the parade organizers have refused the request. In 1993, NYC Human Rights Commission mandated that the IGLO had to be included in the parade, a mandate that was overturned as “unconstitutional” by a Federal judge. The court case was predicated on free speech, asserting that the Ancient Order of Hibernians, which had organized the parade for 150 years, had the right to decide what was said in their parade, and what was not said. That legal precedent has had far deeper consequences. Underlying this battle over a quintessential celebration of Irish-Americanness, there was a question of what Irish-(American)ness is, and who gets to define that identity. Join Averill and Marissa for some of the history of the New York City and Boston St. Patrick’s Day Parades, the fight for inclusion and exclusion, and the shaping of Irish-American identities.

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Show Notes

David Beriss, “Introduction: ‘If you’re gay and Irish, your parents must be English,” in Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power v2 i3 (Taylor and Francis Online, 1996), 189-196.

Richard Conway, “The Gay Ban of New York’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade is Un-Irish,” The Guardian 

Averill Earls, “Queering Dublin: Same-Sex Desire and Masculinities in Ireland, 1884-1950,” Forthcoming Dissertation, SUNY Buffalo, 2016.

Lisa Guido, “St Patrick’s Day Parade, NYC 1991-1992” vimeo

Christopher Harrity, “Out@NBCUniversal Makes St. Patrick’s Day History,” The Advocate

Shelia Langan, “Timeline of the NYC St. Patrick’s Day Parade LGBT Controversy,” IrishCentral 

Daniel Reynolds, “NYC Mayor Opens St. Patrick’s Day Parade to LGBT Marchers,” The Advocate

About the AOH,” Ancient Order of Hibernians