Tag Archives: british history

Science, Reform, and Anti-Vivisection

Things have been pretty political around here lately, so we wanted to dig into something that’s just fascinating and, frankly, creepy: anti-vivisection, or the 19th century campaign to end scientific and medical experimentation on living animals. Join Averill and Sarah as they talk about the practice of vivisection and the efforts to stop it. Also, a word of warning: we use some nineteenth century language when reading quotes, and also describe some pretty graphic events. You might want to turn it down if you’re sensitive or listening with kids.

Sources & Further Reading 

A History of Anti-vivsection from 1800s to the Present: Part I (1800-1914).

Dissecting the Living: Vivisection in Early Modern England,” Chirurgeon’s Apprentice

Davis, Janet M. “The History of Animal Protection in the United States.” The American Historian. 

Johnson, Eric. “Charles Darwin and Vivisection Outrage,” Scientific American, October 6, 2011.

Frances Power Cobbe.

Markel, Howard. “Case Shined First Light on Abuse of Children,” New York Times, December 14, 2009.

McCurry, Justin. “Japan Revisits its darkest moments where American POWs became human experiments,” The Guardian, August 13, 2015.

McNeill, Leila. “Women, Animals, and the Poetry of Activism,” Nursing Clio. 

Prosecution at Norwich: Experiment on Animals,” The British Medical Journal, December 12, 1874.

Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Uncle Tom’s Cabin. 

Renaissance Anatomy.

How America Got Its Bases

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It should come as no surprise that the American military has bases all over the world in strategically important places.  But how did we obtain them, especially those ones that exist in the middle of other sovereign nations?  Join Averill, Katie, and Dan as they discuss American base acquisition in this week’s episode of the History Buffs Podcast.

Show Notes and Further Reading

Diego Garcia:

Diego Garcia Islanders Displaced in U.K. Failure Hope to Return Home,” NPR, April 16, 2015

Scott Foster and Robert Windrem, “Tsunami Spares U.S. Base in Diego Garcia,” NBC News, January 4, 2005

Joshua L. Harris, “U.S. Military Presence in Diego Garcia: National Interests vs. Human Rights,” ICE Case Studies No. 120, December 2003

David Vine, “The Truth About Diego Garcia,” The Huffington Post, June 15, 2015

David Vine, Island of Shame: The Secret History of the U.S. Military Base on Diego Garcia, Princeton University Press, 2011

Guantanamo Bay:

Copy of checks sent to Cuba

The United States, Cuba, and the Platt Amendment, 1901,” Office of the Historian

Agreement Between the United States and Cuba for the Lease of Lands for Coaling and Naval stations, February 23, 1903Yale Law School Avalon Project 

The Case for CLosing – and Keeping Open – Guantanamo,” NPR (6 Mar 2016)

Jess Bravin, The Terror Courts (Yale University Press, 2013) 

Philip Ewing, “Fact Check: Is Obama Handing Guantanamo Bay Back to Cuba?NPR (Feb 25, 2016) 

Alyssa Fetini, “A Brief History of Gitmo,” Time (12 Nov 2008) 

Jeannette L. Nolen, “Guantanamo Bay detention camp,” Encyclopedia Britannica (Updated 22 May 2013)

Michael J. Strauss, The Leasing of Guantanamo Bay (ABC-CLIO, May 14, 2009)


Featured image: Panorama showing 1st, 2nd & 3rd Regiments, U.S. Marines, Deer Point Camp, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, April 26, 1911 (Library of Congress)

Remember the 5th of November

Dan, Averill, and Tommy ponder the meaning of a mask, political and religious oppression, and anarchy. Stuff your Fawkes effigy, we’re talking Bonfire Night / Pope Day / Guy Fawkes Day on the podcast!

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Show Notes & Further Reading

Gunpowder Plot,” The National Archives

Guy Fawkes,” The History Learning site

Ervin Beck, “Children’s Guy Fawkes Customs in Sheffield” Folklore, Vol. 95, No. 2 (1984), pp. 191-203

Lewis Call, “A is for Anarchy, V is for Vendetta: Images of Guy Fawkes and the Creation of Postmodern Anarchism,” Anarchist Studies 16.2 (2008): 154-172,105.

Damian Carrington, “Gunpowder Plot would have devastated London,” New Scientist, November 5, 2003 

Michael Cottrell, “Green and Orange in Mid-Nineteenth-Century Toronto: The Guy Fawkes’ Day Episode of 1864”  The Canadian Journal of Irish Studies, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Jul., 1993), pp. 12-21

Antonia Fraser, Faith and Treason: The Story of the Gunpowder Plot (New York: Doubleday, 1996)

Megan Lane, “If Guy Fawkes had Succeeded,” BBC News, November 4, 2005

John Pollock, The Popish Plot: A Study in the History of the Reign of Charles II (Duckworth: Great Britain, 1903)

James Sharpe, Remember, Remember: A Cultural History of Guy Fawkes Day Harvard University press, 2005

John N. Wall, Jr. and Terry Bunce Burgin. “This Sermon . . . upon the Gun-Powder Day”: The Book of Homilies of 1547 and Donne’s Sermon in Commemoration of Guy Fawkes’ Day, 1622. South Atlantic Review, Vol. 49, No. 2 (May, 1984), pp. 19-30