Author Archives: Dan Wallace

We Belong Here: Manifest Destiny, Immigration, and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo

When we think of immigration we tend to think of people crossing over nation-state borders, from one country to another. These borders seem somehow solid in our collective mind, yet they normally only exist within treaties, maps, and in perceived ideas of community. But in many ways, borders are arbitrary distinctions, attempting to separate one from another but instead creating unique spaces, or borderlands that house a give and take, push and pull, amalgam of culture and people.

In this episode, we are going to be talking about how the United States’ southern border formed and how ideas of race and manifest destiny came to define what it meant to be an American or an immigrant.

Show Notes & Further Reading

Americo Paredes, With His Pistol in His Hand (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1958).

Rodolfo Acuña, Occupied America: A History of Chicanos, vol. 1 (New York: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1972).

Laura E. Gomez, Manifest Destinies: The Making of the Mexican American Race (New York: New York University Press, 2007).

Reginald Horsman, Race and Manifest Destiny : The Origins of American Racial Anglo-Saxonism (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1981).

Raymund A. Paredes, “The Origins of Anti-Mexican Sentiment in the United States,” in Race and U.S. Foreign Policy in the Ages of Territorial and Market Expansion, 1840-1900, ed. Michael L. Krenn (New York: Garland Publishing, Inc., 1998).

Arnoldo De Leon, “Initial Contacts: Redeeming Texas from Mexicans, 1821-1836,” in Race and U.S. Foreign Policy in the Ages of Territorial and Market Expansion, 1840-1900 (New York: Garland Pub., 1998).

Katherine Benton-Cohen, Borderline Americans: Racial Division and Labor War in the Arizona Borderlands, (Harvard University Press, 2011).

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American Accents


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When you produce a podcast, you become hyper-aware of the ways that your fellow hosts speak – those nasally “a” sounds and dropped t’s and g’s really stand out when you’re editing. Where did American accents come from? Dan, Sarah, and Marissa talk about the history of North American accents. (We apologize in advance for our terrible impressions!)

 


 

Show Notes and Further Reading

Dialects of American English

International Dialects of English Archive

“Rful Southern.” Do You Speak American?

Someone Knows Something podcast. CBC.

Edwards, John. “English in Canada.” A Companion to the History of the English Language. Momma, Haruko and Michael Matto (eds). Blackwell Publishing, 2008. Blackwell Reference Online. 10 July 2016 

Enright, Anne. “The Most Irish Island in the World,” The Irish Times 25 Sep 2013 

Fallows, James.  “That Weirdo Announcer Voice Accent: Where It Came From and Why It Went Away,” The Atlantic. 

McDavid, Raven. ‘Postvocalic R in South Carolina: A social analysis’ American Speech 23 (1948):194-203. Reprinted: Dell Hymes, ed., Language in Culture and Society: A reader in linguistics and anthropology, New York: Harper & Row, 1964; A. S. Dil, ed., Varieties of American English: Essays by Raven McDavid, Jr., Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1980.

Mifsud, Rob. “Vowel Movement: How Americans Near the Great Lakes are Radically Changing the Sound of English,” Slate. 

Nosowitz, Dan. “How Capicola Became Gabagool: The Italian New Jersey Accent, Explained,” Atlas Obscura. 

Nosowitz, Dan. “I Made a Linguistics Professor Listen to a Blink-182 Song and Analyze that Accent,” Atlas Obscura. 

Sangster, Catherine. “Received Pronunciation and BBC English,” BBC. 

Schneider, Edgar W. “English in North America.” The Handbook of World Englishes. Kachru, Braj B., Yamuna Kachru and Cecil L. Nelson (eds). Blackwell Publishing, 2006. Blackwell Reference Online.

Sumpter, Althea. “Geechee and Gullah,” New Georgia Encyclopedia. 

Taylor, Trey. “The Rise and Fall of Katharine Hepburn’s Fake Accent,” The Atlantic. 

Turner, Lorenzo Dow. Africanisms in the Gullah Dialect. Columbia: South Carolina Press, 1949.

Wolfram, Walt, and Natalie Schilling-Estes. Hoi Toide on the Outer Banks: The Story of the Ocracoke Brogue. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997. 

Zappa, Moon Unit and Frank Zappa, Valley Girl, 1982

 

The Bank War: Interview with Paul Kahan

In The Bank WarPaul Kahan explores the struggle between Andrew Jackson and the federal banking system. As History Buff Dan notes in his intro to an interview with Kahan, the Bank War was as instrumental in shaping U.S. history as the American Civil War. And Kahan weighs in on the $20 bill debate, revealing why it is a good idea to take Jackson off the federal currency.

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Show Notes & Further Reading

Kahan, Paul. The Bank War: Andrew Jackson, Nicholas Biddle, and the Fight Over American Finances. Westholme Publishing, 2015.

GoT PiH: King’s Landing & Constantinople

Averill, Dan, and special guest Andy Smyser compare the military fortifications of two cities: the fictional Westeros city of King’s Landing and the historical European city of Constantinople. We’re resurrecting that epic battle scene of Season Two – the Battle of Blackwater Bay – to talk about the cutting edge defense tactics Tyrion employed, and similar tactics employed by the protectors of Byzantine Constantinople for almost 700 years. The premier of the sixth season of HBO’s Game of Thrones is April 24th – feed your GoT obsession with our discussion of King’s Landing, Constantinople, and some epic battles.

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Show Notes and Further Reading

The Siege of Constantinople,” Byzantine Military History. 

Basil Aboul-Enein, USAF and Youssef Aboul-Enein, “The Arab Umayyad Muslim Sieges of Constantinople,” The Culture and Conflict Review, 4/1/2012.

Walter E. Kaegi, ” Sieges of Constantinople,” The Reader’s Companion to Military History. Ed. Robert Cowley and Geoffrey Parker. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1996.

David Nicolle, John F. Haldon, Stephen R. Turnbull, The Fall of Constantinople: The Ottoman Conquest of Byzantium. Osprey Publishing, 2007.

 

 

McKinley, Roosevelt, and the Pan-American Exposition

 

The Pan-American Exposition, which opened in May 1901, was the pride of Buffalo. The city sparkled with new electric lights that boasted the power and potential of the electricity produced by nearby Niagara Falls. President William McKinley called it a symbol of the “progress of the human family of the Western Hemisphere.”  Little did President McKinley know this speech, full of hope for the future, would be his last. On September 6, 1901, Buffalo became known for something other than electricity or the glittering Pan American Exposition: it became the city where one president was assassinated, and another was inaugurated. Join Dan and Elizabeth as they discuss an anarchist, an assassination, and the unconventional inauguration of one of our nation’s most unconventional presidents.

As a little plug for our fair city – you should definitely stop in and see the incredible Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site. And while you’re in town, take some time to wander around Delaware Park, where you can check out the last few remnants of the Pan American Exposition (now the Albright Knox Art Gallery and the Buffalo History Museum).  

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Logo of the 1901 Pan American Exposition | Raphael Beck / Public Domain

Show Notes and Further Reading

Fisher, Jack. Stolen Glory: The McKinley Assassination. La Jolla: Alamar Books, 2001.

Kachun, Mitch.”big Jim” Parker and the Assassination of William Mckinley: Patriotism, Nativism, Anarchism, and the Struggle for African American Citizenship.” The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era 9 (1), 93–116.

Miller, Scott. The President and the Assassin: McKinley, Terror, and Empire at the Dawn of the American Century. New York: Random House Publishing, 2013.

Morris, Edmund. Theodore Rex. New York: Random House, 2001.

Morris, Edmund. The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt. New York: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, 1979.

The Last Speech of President William McKinley, September 5, 1901

 

 

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The Ansley Wilcox Mansion, now the Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site  | Courtesy of the Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site Foundation, Buffalo, NY


 

Feature Image: The room where Theodore Roosevelt became president – the library in the Wilcox Mansion | Courtesy of the Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site Foundation, Buffalo, NY