Jazz Cleopatra

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The dizzying and exciting Jazz Age – that glittering period between the end of World War I and the onset of the global Great Depression – is captured best by Europe’s most beloved American performer: Josephine Baker, the “Jazz Cleopatra.” Born in the Jim Crow South, Baker became the most famous performer of the age, beloved in Europe but largely rejected in her home country. Join Marissa, Sarah, and Averill as they talk about everything from sexy bananas to primitivism in an effort to better understand this modern Cleopatra and her age.

 


Show Notes and Further Reading

Patrick O’Connor. “Josephine Baker.” American National Biography Online

Schroeder, Alan and Heather Lehr Wagner. Josephine Baker: Entertainer. New York: Chelsea House, 2006, 81.

Jules-Rosette, Bennetta, Josephine Baker in Art and Life: The Icon and the Image. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2007, 224.

Caravantes, Peggy. The Many Faces of Josephine Baker: Dancer, Singer, Activist, Spy. Chicago: Chicago Review Press, 2015, 151.

Wintz, Cary D. and Paul Finkleman, eds.. Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance.  New York: Routledge, 2000.

Saunders, Thomas J. “The Jazz Age.” A Companion to Europe 1900–1945. Martel, Gordon (ed). Blackwell Publishing, 2005. Blackwell Reference Online. 16 June 2016

Woloch, Nancy. “The Changing Status of Women 1900–1950.” A Companion to the Modern American Novel 1900–1950. Matthews, John T. Blackwell Publishing, 2009. Blackwell Reference Online.

East St. Louis Riot

Cerchiari, Luca, Laurent Cugny, and Franz Kerschbaumer. Eurojazzland. Boston: Northwestern University Press, 2012.

Alicja Sowinska, “Dialects of the Banana Skirt

The Covert History of the American Condom

 Paul Gauguin and Primitivist Modernism or Pursuit of the “Natural”

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