ASGA: Utopianisms

Download this episode (right click and save)

Seas of lemonade, four simultaneous lovers for every woman, and perfectly formulated communities of 810 men and 810 women. Charles Fourier was an idealist, who believed Perfect Harmony could be achieved, if only we better engineered our society. Join Averill, Sarah, and Marissa as they discuss the utopian movements of the 19th century in the U.S., the final installment of our American Second Great Awakening series.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


 

Show Notes and Further Reading

John Humphrey Noyes and the Oneida Perfectionists.”

The Amana Colonies.” Origin of the Amana

Benedict, Philip. Christ’s Churches Purely Reformed: a Social History of Calvinism. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002.

Burden, Tom. “Utopia.” The Blackwell Dictionary of Modern Social Thought. Blackwell Publishing, 2002.

Delano, Sterling F. Brook Farm: The Dark Side of Utopia. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009.

French, David G and Elena French. Working Communally: Patterns and Possibilities. Russell Sage Foundation, 1975.

Gordon, Jessica. “Transcendental Idea: Social Reform.” American Transcendentalism Web 

Hansan, J. “The Amana Colonies: A Utopian Community.” The Social Welfare History Project

Hill, Christopher. The World Turned Upside Down; Radical Ideas During the English Revolution. New York: Viking Press, 1972.

Jennings, Chris. Paradise Now: The Story of American Utopianism. Random House Publishing, 2016.

Noyes, George Wallingford and Lawrence Foster. Free Love in Utopia: John Humphrey Noyes and the Origin of the Oneida Community. Urbana: University of Chicago Press, 2001.

Weishaupt, Adam. The Illuminati Phalanx. Lulu Press, 2013.

Whitney, Terri. “Hawthorne at Brooke Farm.” Hawthorne in Salem

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s