Farewell Episode

It is with great sadness and equally great excitement that we release this episode – our reflection on two years of History Buffing. In the fall, the show will be rebranded as Dig: A History Podcast, as a few of our founding members are putting podcasting into the backseat of their lives as they pursue careers and degrees, and Averill, Marissa, Elizabeth, and Sarah embark on a new iteration of what you’ve come to expect from the History Buffs.

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But FIRST – we won something really cool! The American Association of State and Local History is honoring us with a Leadership in History Award. Averill & Elizabeth will go all the way to Austin, Texas in September to receive the award officially, but we wanted to share the good news with all of you. Highlighting local history has been a goal of the podcast from the get-go, so we are so thrilled and proud that our work on Western New York is worthy of national recognition.

Thank you, dear listeners, for supporting us, listening to us, and journeying with us. Check back this summer for a few remastered episodes, and then tune in and subscribe to Dig in September!

As always, you can keep up with us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

We apologize for the sound quality here – we aren’t used to recording with five people at once – and promise that the fall launch of Dig will be more like the superior quality we’ve achieved in recent months.

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Jungles, Genocide, and Dictators: The Story of Central African Refugees in the 1990s

There has been a lot of comparison recently between the current refugee crisis in the Middle East to the plight of refugees during World War II.  The twentieth century had another major crisis that is often overlooked, however:  the flight of refugees from Rwanda and the Congo during the mid-1990s.  This crisis produced more refugees than any event since World War II, and they trekked through some of the thickest jungle on Earth to escape violence and advancing armies.  Join Katie and Averill as they discuss the plight of these Central African refugees.  It’s a story that has echoes through to today.

Rwandan refugee camp in eastern Zaire, 1994

Rwandan refugee camp in eastern Zaire, 1994, Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Show Notes and Further Reading

David van Reybrouck, Congo: The Epic History of a People, Harper Collins, 2014

Jason Stearns, Dancing in the Glory of Monsters: The Collapse of the Congo and the Great War of Africa, PublicAffairs, 2012

The Borgen Project, “Ten Facts About Democratic Republic of the Congo Refugees”

European Resettlement Network, “Congolese Refugees”

Frontline, Ghosts of Rwanda, Interview with Alison des Forges

Alison des Forges, Leave None to Tell the Story1999

Peace, War, and Protest in Buffalo: The Buffalo Nine

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We are super excited – this is our first listener request! The late 1960s were a tumultuous time in the United States – major political assassinations, riots, protests, and a deeply controversial war all added up to a fractured and bruised society. Much of the action during the time period took place on college campuses – our own University at Buffalo included. Today, Sarah and Averill are talking about the court case at the heart of some of the most intense protests the University has ever seen: The Buffalo Nine.

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Show Notes & Further Reading 

Bruce Beyer Oral History, Council Member David A. Franczyk and the Fillmore District Presents Community Spotlight, 2013.

Buffalo Police, Then and Now

Committee on Armed Services, Hearings Before the Committee on Armed Service, United States Senate, Ninety-First Congress, Second Session, on S. 3367 and H. R. 17123, (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1970), 1094

Goldman, Mark. City on the Lake: The Challenge of Change in Buffalo, New York (Amherst: Prometheus Books, 1990)

Goldman, Mark. High Hopes: The Rise and Decline of Buffalo, New York (Albany: SUNY Press, 1983).

Hayes Hall Named to National Register of Historic Places (see slideshow of images of UB’s history!)

On This Day in History: Buffalo Nine Arrested, 1968

Patterson, James T. Grand Expectations: The United States, 1945-1974 (Cambridge: Oxford University Press, 1996).

Small, Melvin. Antiwarriors: The Vietnam War and The Battle for America’s Hearts and Minds (New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002)

Twenty Years Later,The Buffalo News, December 17, 1988.

The Selective Service System, “The Vietnam Lotteries

Whitcher, Ann. “A Stormy Spring,” UBtoday, Winter 2005.

The Whiskey Rebellion (Cross-over with Shots of History!)

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It’s a cross-over! This week we joined Cody Wheat from the Shots of History podcast to talk about that one time that George Washington sent the army to deal to force some country bumpkins to pay their taxes – in other words, the Whiskey Rebellion. How did we become a nation of whiskey-drinkers, why was whiskey taxed in the late 18th century, and what kind of legacy did the Rebellion leave? Join Marissa, Sarah, and Cody to learn all about it.

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Show Notes & Further Reading 

Lender, Mark Edward, and James Kirby Martin. Drinking in America: A History (New York: Free Press, 1987).

Slaughter, Thomas. The Whiskey Rebellion: Frontier Epilogue to the American Revolution (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1988).

George Washington, Covenanter Squatters Historical Marker

Just for funsies: One Last Ride,” the song about the Whiskey Rebellion that was cut from Hamilton: The Musical

Straight Edge: Historian vs Hardcore Kid

This week, we are talking Straight Edge and the Hardcore music scene with not one but two special guests!  Colin Eager is a PhD candidate at the University at Buffalo who studies youth culture and political radicalization in the Reagan era, and Mark Miller is the host of HMNI Fanzine podcast, a hardcore podcast inspired from his earlier work on hardcore fanzines.  Join Marissa, Averill, Colin, and Mark as they discuss music, the Straight Edge scene, activism, and youth culture.  It’s a crossover episode you won’t want to miss!

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The band Minor Threat coined the term "straight edge"

The band Minor Threat coined the term “straight edge”- Photo By Malco23Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

 

Show Notes and Further Reading (and Listening!)

Ross Haenfler, Straight Edge: Hardcore Punk, Clean Living Youth, and Social Change, (New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 2005).

Ross Haenfler, Subcultures: The Basics, (London: Routledge, 2013).

Dick Hebdige, Subculture: The Meaning of Style, (London: Routledge, 1979).

Gabriel Kuhn, Sober Living for the Revolution: Hardcore Punk, Straight Edge, and Radical Politics, (Oakland: PM Press, 2010).

Jamie Mullaney, “All In Time: Age And The Temporality Of Authenticity In The Straight-Edge Music Scene,” Journal Of Contemporary Ethnography 41:6 (2012): 611-635.

Robert Wood, “The Straightedge Youth Sub-Culture: Observations on the Complexity of Sub-Cultural Identity,” Journal of Youth Studies, 6:1 (2003): 33-52.

Black X, Mark’s Buffalo-based Hardcore Straight Edge band

HMNI Fanzine Podcast, Mark’s podcast

Devil’s Advocate-Buffalo Style Demo 2005

Minor Threat-Straight Edge

Youth of Today biography on Revelation Records

“The American Drug Panic of the 1980s: Social Construction or Objective Threat?”

“Break Down the Walls: An Oral History of Youth of Today’s 1987 tour, a Defining Moment for American Hardcore,” May 11, 2017

 

 

Black Athena Controversy: Battle of Historians


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In 1987, a historian of modern China wrote a book that was way outside of his field – a historiographical work about the classical world, which argued that argued a racist and imperialist Europe had written Egyptian and Phoenician origins out of Greek history — essentially whitewashing the African roots of Western civilization. The book caused a firestorm within the field of Classics, launching a series of rebuttals and re-rebuttals. Today’s episode is about the thesis that Bernal posed in his Black Athena, but it is also a peek behind the curtain of the academic world. It might get a little weird – because our discussion will be about the evidence Bernal used to support his assertion that Egyptian and Levantine civilizations significantly shaped ancient Greek civilization, but we will also dive into the backlash against Bernal’s work, and what that says about our profession, and how even historians are human and thus susceptible to the world in which we live. Join Averill and Sarah to learn more about Black Athena – and how the historical sausage gets made. 

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Show Notes & Further Reading 

“Antenor Firmin, The ‘Egyptian Question,’ and Afrocentric Imagination,” The Journal of Pan-African Studies 7 (August 2014).

Belucci, Nina, Sri Bellucci, Kevin Hofelmann, “The Black Athena Controversy: Introduction” 

Bernal, Martin. Black Athena: Afroasiatic Roots of Classical Civilization Volume III. (New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, 1987)

Bowersock, Glenn. Rescuing the Greeks. The New York Times, February 25, 1995.

Herodotus, The Histories. 

Kastor, Caroline. “African Athena: Discussions Surrounding Martin Bernal’s Black Athena,” PhD Dissertation, University of Kansas, 2016.

Keita, Meghan. “Blackness in Ancient History: Criticism and Critique,” Race and the Writing of History: Riddling the Sphinx (Cambridge: Oxford University Press, 2000)

Lefkowitz, Mary. Not Out of Africa: How Afrocentrism Became An Excuse to Teach Myth As History (New York: BasicBooks, 1996)

Martin Bernal: Historian Best Known for Hist Controversial ‘Black Athena” Books,” The Independent, August 28, 2013. 

Warren, Sam. “Martin Bernal Revisits ‘Black Athena’ Controversy in Lecture,” Cornell Chronicle, October 18, 2007.

Bitter Sweet: Sugar, Slavery, Empire, and Consumerism in the Atlantic World

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Sugar has become ubiquitous in modern-day cuisine: it’s pretty much everywhere and in everything we eat.  But how did this White Gold earn its place in consumer culture?  Join Averill, Marissa, and Katie as they discuss the history of sugar cultivation and its relationship to empire and consumerism.

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Show Notes and Further Reading:

James Patterson Smith, “Empire and Social Reform: British Liberals and the ‘Civilizing Mission in the Sugar Colonies,’ 1868-1874,” Albion 27.2 (1995) 253-77

Philip D. Rotz, “Sweetness and Fever? Sugar Production, Aeses aegypti, and Dengue Fever in Natal, South Africa, 1926-27,” PSAE Research Series 12 (2014)

Bussa’s Rebellion,” UK National Archives 

Carol MacLennan, Sovereign Sugar : Industry and Environment in Hawaiʻi (University of Hawaii, 2014)

Alice G. Walton, “How Much Sugar Are Americans Eating?” Forbes (Aug 2012) 

Britain is built on sugar: our national sweet tooth defines us,” The Guardian (Oct 2007)

Karl Watson, “Slavery and Economy in Barbados,” BBC (2/2011) 

Barrie Cook, “Pieces of Eight,” History of the World in 100 Objects (BBC & British Museum) 

Emma George Ross, “The Portuguese in Africa, 1415-1600,” Met Museum 

Matthew Edel, “The Brazilian Sugar Cycle of the Seventeenth Century and the Rise of the West Indian Competition,” Caribbean Studies 9.1 (1969) 24-43.

Mark Johnson, “The Sugar Trade in the West Indies and Brazil between 1492 and 1700,” University of Minnesota Expansion of Empire Seminar 

Sidney W. Mintz, “The Culture History of a Puerto Rican Sugar Cane Plantation: 1876-1949,” The Hispanic American Historical Review 33.2 (1953) 224-251.

Heather Pringle, “Sugar Masters in a New World,” Smithsonian.com (January 2010)  

Feature image: Historia Naturalis Brasiliae (p51) modified by Averill Earls.

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